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Here’s All the Fashion News You Missed This Week

LVMH opposes Kering's under-18 model ban, how clickbait is driving fashion sales and more.

Kering Bans All Models Under 18; LVMH Claps Back

Kering, the parent company that owns Gucci, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, Alexander McQueen and more, has announced a new company policy that all models hired must be over the age of 18, effective 2020. The undeveloped bodies of teenage models have long been viewed as aspirational within the fashion industry (creepy!) and this appears to be a step in the right direction towards representation that more accurately reflects the brand’s customer base. “We believe that we have a responsibility to put forward the best possible practices in the luxury sector and we hope to create a movement that will encourage others to follow suit,” François-Henri Pinault, CEO of Kering told WWD. Then, in a bizarrely catty move, LVMH announced they “would not be following suit.” Antoine Arnault, the LVMH’s head of communication and image, said “Let’s not kid ourselves: It’s not because one group bans these models that they will stop working. On the contrary, we provide them with a protected environment, so I am totally against this ban on models aged under 18.” He then cited Kaia Gerber as a reason to continue employing 16-year-old models. Okay, bro. The move marks a rift in the charter signed by both rival companies in 2017 that was the result of both companies drawing up a charter of industry standards to protect models. At the time, both companies agreed banned the employment of models under the age of 16. (WWD/WWD)

Away Suitcases Just Received $100 Million in Series D Investment

Away, the sleeker-than-thou direct-to-consumer suitcase brand, just received a rather significant cash infusion to the tune of $100 million in Series D investment.  “What is Series D investment?”, those who don’t speak startup might be asking. Well, it refers to the stage of maturity a startup is at; investments that come at the very beginning of a startups tenure are called seed investments while Series D reflects that Away has already been running a successful business for three years.  According to a press release, Away reached $12 million in sales in its first 12 months, grew to $150 million in sales in 2018, and is projected to double its sales in 2019.  “This new capital will further fuel our plans to fully build a global community of passionate travelers, and equip them with every product they need to travel more seamlessly,” said Jen Rubio, co-founder and Chief Brand Officer, said in a statement. (Press Release)

Gigi Hadid Stars in Burberry’s Latest Campaign

When provocateur designer Riccardo Tisci first took the helm of Burberry in 2018, one of his first moves as creative director to reinvigorate the 163-year-old brand’s logo. He tapped former New Order member Peter Saville to create a retro interlocked version of the initials ‘TB’ in homage to Burberry’s founder, Thomas Burberry. Now Tisci is shaking things up yet again, choosing Gigi Hadid to front the brand’s new monogram collection campaign. In four separate images, Hadid takes on different British stereotypes, playing a British chav, a tie-wearing businessman, a streetwear thot, and a posh elite. Overall, the collection goes a long way to demonstrate the versatility of the new logo. (Fashionista)

Clickbait Fashion is the Latest Strategy Brands are Using to Garner Attention

Remember janties? Those minuscule strips of denim that amounted to more or less a very stiff pair of underwear? They’re just one of many clothing items that have gone viral as of late for their sheer ridiculousness (Fashion Nova ripped denim and transparent PVC pants also come to mind), yet despite how much everyone seems to hate these garments, apparently being at the centre of an internet outrage cycle actually helps to drive sales. “Hype is real,” Lyst’s vice-president of communications, Katy Lubin, told The Guardian. In the case of janties, Lyst recorded a 2,250% increase in searches for the item on their platform, and the style sold out and received a restock on SSENSE. Apparently their viral popularity marked them as one of the main trends of festival season (Coachella was comedically dubbed “Buttchella” by one horrified fashion reporter). So next time you feel the urge to fire off a tweet making fun of a pair of pants, perhaps curb the impulse if it’s about something you don’t want to see in the near future. As they say, any hot hair helps a balloon get off the ground. You’re only contributing to the problem. (The Guardian)