Tiffany & Co. Releases First Fragrance in 15 Years

Tiffany & Co. Releases Their First Fragrance in 15 Years

"It’s a messenger of a time capsule that allows us to situate ourselves between yesterday, today and tomorrow. Fragrance has that power.”

Chatting with perfumer Daniela Andrier is the fragrance equivalent of a science geek speaking with Stephen Hawking. Like the author of A Brief History of Time, Andrier has a poetic fascination with time—especially the role fragrance plays in marking it. “I do consider perfumery a magical messenger between the unconscious and the conscious and between the past and the now,” she explains at the launch of Tiffany & Co. (from $120), the iconic jewellery house’s first new scent in 15 years. “It’s not a messenger of nostalgia; it’s a messenger of a time capsule that allows us to situate ourselves between yesterday, today and tomorrow. Fragrance has that power.”

Marking those memories, moments and promises has always been the romantic fantasy one associates with Tiffany. Those joyful occasions are what Andrier tried to capture in the floral musk. She describes the process of creating a fragrance as mysterious, adding that it comes out of her like a song you’d sing when you’re unafraid that someone will judge your voice. “What comes to you is the result of the substance of your vital energy—your love for life. These moments are magical, and they’re very poetic.”

The opening note to her Tiffany & Co. “song” is vert de mandarine, but the heart of the fragrance is iris. Andrier chose it because she’s “obsessed” with it and because it has long been associated with Tiffany, appearing in the house’s famous illustrations and on lamps, stained glass windows and jewellery, according to Melvyn Kirtley, Tiffany’s chief gemologist. “Wearing a fragrance, like one wears a piece of jewellery, is a very ritualistic part of your day,” he says.

Tiffany & Co. Releases First Fragrance in 15 Years
The bottle design references the iconic 128.54-carat yellow Tiffany diamond as well as the Lucida engagement ring. Its multiple facets are meant to illuminate the blue-tinted juice. Photography courtesy of Tiffany.