5 Things Brad Pitt Admits In His First Post-Divorce Interview

In his first interview since his and Angelina’s split back in September 2016, Brad Pitt reveals some new truths in his cover story for GQ. Along with a stunning photo shoot that portrays a thinner, older, sadder Pitt, the article addresses rumours, albeit in a roundabout way, regarding reasons for Brangelina’s breakup.

The media led many to believe that the deciding factor for their divorce was the flight on September 16, 2016, when Brad allegedly had an altercation with son Maddox. But according to a source on Us Weekly, Angelina had decided much before that event that enough was enough.

Now, disaster control is in full effect, as Brad picks up the pieces of his shattered life. Lainey Gossip calls his bluff, saying that this is a PR stunt to get people back on Team Brad before the launch of his film, War Machine, later this month. Hmmm.

The level of sincerity that writer Michael Paternini portrays of Brad is sky-high as he extracts quotes and stories that make you feel bad for the guy. Also, that hazy shot in which tears well in his eyes? Is it true sadness or the actor in him? Regardless, here are the five most revealing moments from the interview.

He admits to a long history of “boozing”

“I can’t remember a day since I got out of college when I wasn’t boozing or had a spliff, or something. Something. And you realize that a lot of it is, um—cigarettes, you know, pacifiers. And I’m running from feelings. I’m really, really happy to be done with all of that. I mean I stopped everything except boozing when I started my family. But even this last year, you know—things I wasn’t dealing with. I was boozing too much. It’s just become a problem. And I’m really happy it’s been half a year now, which is bittersweet, but I’ve got my feelings in my fingertips again.”

He lost a good thing

“You strip down to the foundation and break out the mortar. I don’t know. For me this period has really been about looking at my weaknesses and failures and owning my side of the street. I’m an asshole when it comes to this need for justice. I don’t know where it comes from, this hollow quest for justice for some perceived slight. I can drill on that for days and years. It’s done me no good whatsoever. It’s such a silly idea, the idea that the world is fair. And this is coming from a guy who hit the lottery, I’m well aware of that. I hit the lottery, and I still would waste my time on those hollow pursuits.”

He found a therapist

“You know, I just started therapy. I love it, I love it. I went through two therapists to get to the right one.”

He’s learning to swallow his pride

“I come from a place where, you know, it’s strength if we get a bruise or cut or ailment we don’t discuss it, we just deal with it. We just go on. The downside of that is it’s the same with our emotion. I’m personally very retarded when it comes to taking inventory of my emotions. I’m much better at covering up. I grew up with a Father-knows-best/war mentality—the father is all-powerful, super strong—instead of really knowing the man and his own self-doubt and struggles. And it’s hit me smack in the face with our divorce: I gotta be more. I gotta be more for them. I have to show them. And I haven’t been great at it.”

He could be a better dad

“Family first. People on their deathbeds don’t talk about what they obtained or were awarded. They talk about their loved ones or their regrets—that seems to be the menu. I say that as someone who’s let the work take me away. Kids are so delicate. They absorb everything. They need to have their hand held and things explained. They need to be listened to. When I get in that busy work mode, I’m not hearing. I want to be better at that.”